Big time: Red Sox, Crawford reach seven-year $142M deal

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Incredible.  Absolutely incredible.

According to Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe, the Red Sox have reached agreement on a seven-year, $142 million contract with outfielder Carl Crawford, making him the richest outfielder in Major League Baseball history.

The Angels were called the front-runners for Crawford all day long at the Winter Meetings and reports just hours ago had them moving aggressively toward the finalization of a contract.

All that talk must have woken up the Boston front office, because they barged in with a massive deal and secured a signature this evening.

It’s a bold but brilliant move by a club that missed the playoffs this year for the first time since 2006.  Lest we forget, they added Adrian Gonzalez from the Padres just a few days ago.  Gonzalez is a solid defender at first base and Crawford covers all sorts of ground in the outfield.

The defense is good.  The offense is even better.

Crawford hit .307 with 19 homers, 90 RBI and 110 runs scored in 2010 for the Rays.  He was worth 6.9 WAR (Wins Against Replacement), more than Robinson Cano and Miguel Cabrera.  Gonzalez slugged 31 home runs this year while playing half of his games in baseball’s biggest park.  He’s going to punish Fenway Park’s Green Monster with doubles and a whole lot of homers.

Seriously, check out this spray chart of Gonzalez’s hits from this season.  Those are all of the spots that the first baseman sent baseballs in 2010 at PETCO Park, overlapped as to where they’d land if he were batting in Fenway.

To improve so vastly on both offense and defense in one winter is remarkable and possibly unprecedented.

The Red Sox are alive and well.  The American League East is out of control.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.