Jason Varitek is close to returning to Boston on a one-year deal

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Face it Boston fans: Jason Varitek is going to be playing for the Sox until your grandkids have grandkids.  Peter Gammons just reported that the Sox is about to sign a $2 million contract.

You have to think that this means that Saltalamacchia is the starter and Varitek the backup, right? Of course that’s the case.  Except, man, if you’re Saltalamacchia, don’t you have to be a bit nervous? He’s not Victor Martinez, whose obviously superior talent kept in the starting slot no matter what happened. He’s a kid, still yet to realize his potential and about whom many questions have already been raised by the columnists and talk radio. I liken the dynamic to your girlfriend keeping her ex-boyfriend around for yard work purposes. She says she loves you, baby, but you can’t feel too secure about things.

Varitek is no longer a viable starter, but if Salty struggles, you know damn well people are going to cry out for the Captain to be behind the plate.  In the grand scheme of things this is a small problem — and there are about a zillion worse caddies for Salty to have than the guy who knows more about catching in Boston than anyone this side of Carlton Fisk — but really, you have to wonder when, if ever, the Sox are going to move away from Varitek.

Matt Carpenter hit a standup bunt double

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The wave of defensive shifts we’ve seen over the past few years has led to a lot of armchair hitting coaches demanding that players bunt to beat it. This is easier said than done, however.

The shift happens because certain hitters tend to pull the ball. Certain hitters tend to pull the ball because pulling the ball is what happens when one gets a strong, quick swing on a pitch one identifies early and which one endeavors to send as far away from home plate as possible. Which is to say that pulling is a skill that is good to have and which is strongly selected for among hitters.

In light of that, “why not just bunt to beat the shift” takes are kind of lazy. Bunting is hard! And it is not a thing guys who get shifted a lot are good at. Most of the time asking a player to do a thing he is not well-equipped to do is a bad idea. Indeed, a hitter voluntarily going away from his strength is something the defense would much prefer.

Most of the time anyway.

Last night Matt Carpenter made those armchair hitting coaches happy by laying down a bunt to beat the shift. And he laid it down so well that he ended up with a standup double:

One batter later Carpenter scored on a Starlin Castro error.

The shift giveth and the shift taketh away.