Frank McCourt accepts the settlement proposal; Jamie rejects it

9 Comments

We’re heading towards a judge’s ruling regarding who owns the Dodgers. That’s because yesterday Jamie McCourt rejected the settlement proposed by the mediator.  Frank accepted it, but as we know, it takes two to tango.

The best part was Frank’s statement afterward, issued through his lawyers, in which he said that accepting it was “the responsible thing to do for his family, the Dodgers organization and the entire community,” and that  “we can only conclude that Jamie . . . is allowing this matter to drag on further.”

This despite the fact that the parties are subject to a strict gag order regarding the settlement process and the case at large. The L.A. Times story quoted someone saying that this was calculated by Frank to make Jamie look greedy.  Know what? After everything we’ve learned about the McCourts over the past year, I don’t think either side needs the other’s help in that regard. And I bet the judge rips Frank a new one over it.

That aside, we can assume one thing: Jamie’s rejection of the settlement — which I believe likely favored Jamie to begin with — suggests that she feels very strongly about her case. She must be convinced that the judge is going to invalidate the post-marital agreement and make the Dodgers community property.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
Getty Images
2 Comments

The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.