Shaughnessy: The Red Sox should give Jeter $60 million

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Last week a few people had some fun on Twitter suggesting that the Red Sox — in the interests of promoting chaos — should make Jeter an offer. Pete Abraham mentioned it. I did. Some others too.  It was mildly chuckle-worthy during a slow week. Today, however, Dan Shaugnessy shows us that not every little clever zinger on Twitter is worthy of its own column:

There is simply no downside to making Jeter a massive offer. In the worst-case scenario he calls your bluff and you get the Yankees captain. I don’t care if Jeter is way past his prime or if the Sox would have to wildly overpay a player of his diminished skills.

I say offer him the world. Forget about Jayson Werth. Blow Jeter away with dollars and years. At worst this would just mean the Sox would jack up the final price the Yankees must pay. It could be sort of like Mark Teixeira-in-reverse. And if Jeter actually signed with Boston, the damage to the Yankees’ psyche would be inestimable.

Shaughnessy says the Sox should offer Jeter three years at $20 million per.  And I think he’s quite serious. $60 million to “damage the Yankees’ psyche.”  No discussion whatsoever of what having Derek Jeter as the starting shortstop at that salary would mean to, you know, the competitive position of the Red Sox for the next three years. No apparent understanding that, unlike Shaughnessy himself, the people who run the Red Sox these days don’t think of the world as an epic Yankees-Red Sox battle in which sense and reason is discarded. No actual baseball analysis at all.  It’s pure red meat for the “screw the Yankees” crowd.

Which is fine on some level because I know this is sports, and sports shouldn’t always be sober and serious.  But this is the sort of thing that you have to keep in mind when Shaughnessy and others who peddle this stuff turn around and demand that they themselves be taken seriously.

Video: Edwin Encarnación grounds into 5-4-3 triple play

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The Yankees threatened early against the Twins in the top of the first inning of Monday night’s game in Minnesota. DJ LeMahieu and Aaron Judge drew leadoff walks Martín Pérez, bringing up slugger Edwin Encarnación. Encarnación battled Pérez, ultimately rolling over on the ninth pitch, a change-up. Third baseman Luis Arraez gobbled it up and stepped on the third base bag, then fired to Jonathan Schoop at second base for the second out. Schoop got the ball over to Miguel Sanó at first base just in time to complete the 5-4-3 triple play.

It’s the second triple play turned this year, as the White Sox also accomplished a 5-4-3 double play on May 22 against the Astros. The Twins’ last triple play occurred on June 1, 2017 against the Angels, also a 5-4-3 triple-killing.

The Yankees were eventually able to generate some offense in the third inning on a Gio Urshela solo homer and an RBI single from Encarnación. It’s a 2-2 game as this gets published.