Can someone please explain the Troy Tulowitzki deal to me?

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At least from the Rockies’ perspective?

Tulowitzki is a great talent. If I were starting a team now he’d be on the short list of players who might be my first pick. He’s obviously loved in Colorado.  But a six year extension that starts in 2015? Really? What was motivating the Rockies to extend a guy who was under team control through 2014 already? Was the prospect of Todd Helton’s deal finally falling off the books in 2013 too scary to contemplate? “Quick! We need to find a way to spend an unreasonable chunk of our limited payroll on one player after 2013! Sign Tulo for a decade, stat!”

A lot can happen in four seasons. Ask Eric Chavez. There is a possibility that the extension portion of this deal is an albatross before it even kicks in.  And what about value for the length of the deal? Derek Jeter made a ten year contract work, but at least he was on the verge of free agency at the time. Todd Helton is proof positive — right in front of the Rockies’ noses — that a deal of that length can go sideways. Helton’s was originally a nine-year deal. It was pretty good four four years. It was serviceable for a fifth. Since then he has been a role player or worse, making so much money that it has limited the Rockies’ financial flexibility to go out and get other pieces.

The same could easily happen to Tulowitzki. Indeed, I’d say that odds favor it. The per-annum dollars themselves aren’t crazy, but that length and the timing is.  This isn’t as bad as Alex Rodriguez’s current deal, but unless the economics of the Colorado Rockies change fundamentally, it will eat up a larger percentage of team payroll each year than A-Rod’s deal ever did. What was pushing this onto the Rockies’ agenda?

Oh well, it’s not my money.  And hey, there’s a bright side: if mid-market teams are back to signing guys for a decade, I suppose that’s proof positive that the recession is truly over.

Cubs sign infielder Daniel Descalso

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The Chicago Cubs have signed free agent infielder Daniel Descalso. The deal is for two years and is worth $5 million, with a club option for 2021 that could bring the total overall value to $8.25 million.

Descalso, 32, has spent the past two seasons in Arizona. Before that he spent two years with the Rockies. He began his career with the Cardinals, playing in St. Louis for five seasons. He’s a career .240/.324/.370 hitter (85 OPS+) who can cover multiple positions. Indeed, in 2018 alone he played first, second, third, left field, DH and he even pitched twice. In his career he has also played a great deal of shortstop, though not regularly for a couple of years.

In an age of short benches and big bullpens, it pays to have a super utility guy. Descalso may not be Marwin Gonzalez as far as quality goes, but he’s just as flexible a lot more affordable. That’s worth at least something.