The Boras-Salcedo loan didn’t even violate MLBPA rules

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Last week we spent a lot of time talking about the loan Scott Boras gave to his client, Edward Salcedo. You’ll recall that the New York Times portrayed it as something nefarious. Boras’ subsequent comments about it, however, combined with some of my own deduction, lead me to believe that there was nothing really wrong with the loan and that the story was evidence of an agenda at work. Possible agendas? To paint the Dominican Republic as a lawless land in desperate need of tighter MLB control. Or, at the very least, to slam Scott Boras, because we know how fun that is to do.  My final assessment last week: at worst we have a violation of union rules which, while serious in and of itself, is not a dire thing.

Turns out we don’t even have a violation of union rules. Keith Law runs it down today and it seems that even if everything we read in the initial article was true, no MLBPA rules were violated by the Boras-Salcedo loan.

So the question is this:  who’s out to slam Scott Boras? It’s gotta be somebody, or else this should have registered as a non-story.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.