Javy Vazquez is turning down multi-year offers

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Javier Vazquez obviously wants to cleanse the palate after that awful year he had in New York, and to that end he has reportedly been looking for a make-good deal in a pitcher-friendly environment.  But apparently he’s taking the definition of “make good” to a bit of an extreme, as ESPN is reporting that he has turned down multi-year offers worth as much as $10 million a year, preferring instead to take a single-year offer.

I have no factual basis to question such a report, but I must ask: really?

What’s the point of a make-good contract if it isn’t to, with a little luck, win yourself a longer or more lucrative contract down the road?  Isn’t a two-year $20 million offer pretty good? If he can really get the “good” without the “make” part, why wouldn’t he take it?  Just seems odd to me.

All of that said, I’ll grant that I tend to undervalue mid-rotation pitchers this time of year and always find myself a bit surprised at what some of them end up signing for. Maybe Vazquez will do better than $10 million after imploding at $11.5 million last year.

But if he doesn’t, and if he ends up pitching on a one-year, $8 million deal in Florida or something, I do hope someone asks him why he didn’t take the 2/$20MM offer with whatever mystery team is floating it.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

Tim Warner/Getty Images
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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.