Quote of the Day: Buster Olney on Terry Collins

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I’ve read a bunch of Terry Collins reactions this morning. Most of them aren’t all that insightful, frankly, because the guy just doesn’t have a recent track record anyone can grab onto. He’s intense. Some players who are now in their mid-40s didn’t much care for him. Hard to really find any traction with that.

Of all of them, though, I liked Buster Olney’s the best.  Olney is a writer with New York experience but, since he’s not a New Yorker, has a pretty good perspective on the press scene there. At the same time, he watched Collins in the minor leagues and after he took over the Angels.  His take:

Lest there be any doubt, Collins is more than smart enough to adapt. He certainly will recognize the pitfalls as he starts out. The question is whether he’s changed enough to survive. One thing is almost certain: Terry Collins, as good a baseball man as there is, will be an overwhelming success or a complete disaster.

And that’s based on not just Collins, but the New York environment, which I think he nails: it’s not that everything is So Much More Important in New York. It’s that everything — no matter how insignificant it actually is — is treated like it’s so much more important.  And I agree with that “success or failure; no middle ground” thing.  No matter what happens, I imagine that there will be fairly strong feelings about the guy two years from now, as opposed to general, apathetic Jerry Manuel misery.

And that’s an improvement, right?

Manny Machado called for interference with Orlando Arcia

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Fresh off our “Manny Machado didn’t hustle” post, here’s one about him trying a little too hard. Machado was called for interference in the bottom of the fourth inning during Monday night’s NLCS Game 3 against the Brewers at Dodger Stadium. It was actually Machado’s second attempt to interfere with Orlando Arcia during the game.

In the bottom of the second, Machado led off with a single. Cody Bellinger followed up by hitting a grounder to second baseman Travis Shaw, who fed to Arcia. Machado slid towards Arcia enough to disrupt the play, allowing Bellinger to reach first base safely. The Brewers didn’t challenge, in part because Arcia didn’t attempt a throw.

Fast forward to the bottom of the fourth. Machado again leads off and again reaches base, this time with a walk. Bellinger hits another grounder. First baseman Jesús Aguilar snags the ball and fires to Arcia covering the second base bag. Machado slides into second base and reaches out with his right hand to mess with Arcia’s throw to first base. It succeeds, as Arcia’s throw skips past first base towards the dugout. Brewers manager Craig Counsell challenged the call, alleging slide interference (the “Chase Utley rule”). The umpires reviewed the play and agreed that Machado did indeed interfere with Arcia, so Bellinger was called out. What made Machado’s effort even worse is that Bellinger would’ve reached easily regardless, so there was no need to interfere with Arcia.

The Dodgers trail the Brewers 1-0 through the first half of the game. The Brewers got their run early thanks to an RBI double by Ryan Braun off of Walker Buehler in the top of the first. Jhoulys Chacín has pitched excellently for the Brewers thus far.