UPDATE: Jim Leyritz acquitted on DUI manslaughter charges

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UPDATE: According to Curt Anderson of the Associated Press, Jim Leyritz was acquitted on DUI manslaughter charges for a December 2007 crash that resulted in the death of Fredia Ann Veitch. However, he was convicted on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence, which could put him in jail for a maximum sentence of six months.

In other words, he’s incredibly fortunate today. Leyrtiz could have faced up to 15 years in prison if he was convicted for the DUI manslaughter charge. Let’s hope he does something useful with a second chance.

9:30 AM: A quick update on Jim Leyrtiz’s trial.

According to the South Florida Sun Sentinel, after six hours of deliberation on Friday, the jurors in Leyritz’s DUI manslaughter trial said that they were deadlocked.

“We have reached a stalemate. We have completely decided that we cannot reach a decision,” the panel of five men and one woman wrote the judge about 6 p.m. Friday in the second day of deliberations. “How do we proceed?”

Circuit Judge Marc Gold asked the jury to discuss the case further and attempt to reach a unanimous decision. They’ll do so today. If they are unable to reach a verdict, a mistrial will be declared. According to the Associated Press, prosecutors say there would be a second trial, which hopefully won’t take another three years.

In December of 2007, Leyritz allegedly drove drunk and ran a red light when he hit a vehicle driven by Fredia Ann Veitch, who was killed. The former Yankee faces between four and 15 years in prison if convicted.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.