The Astros are for sale

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Mark Cuban and Jim Crane, please call your office . . .

Astros owner Drayton McLane has retained the services of the investment bank Allen & Company to assist in the sale of the team, according to two people with knowledge of the arrangement.

McLane, who could not be reached for comment Thursday night, has owned the Astros since 1992. Having entertained on and off for at least a couple of years the idea of selling, he has ramped up efforts recently.

McLane has toyed with selling the Astros in the past, but you don’t hire an investment bank if you’re toying.  He really wants to sell this time.  Maury has more details over at the Biz of Baseball. The upshot, though: McLane wants around $800 million. Any purchase of the team would include a stake in the newly created regional sports network CSN Houston.  Bonus: no one is bankrupt this time, so any sale would likely take less than nine months and multiple rounds of litigation.

Which means this won’t be much fun at all, sadly.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.