Losers walk: Only one end zone will be in use for the football game in Wrigley Field

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I said earlier this week that, based on the funky alignment of the gridiron and just how close the brick wall was to the end zone, Wrigley Field looked like an awful place to play tomorrow’s Northwestern-Illinois game.  I didn’t even know the half of it:

Only one end zone will be used at Wrigley Field on Saturday for the Illinois-Northwestern game because of safety concerns, Illinois sports information director Kent Brown said Friday.

The east end zone is feet away from the right-field wall, and although there is padding, there was still concerns that injuries could take place. Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald had said he would have different game plans for the different end zones to avoid the possibility of injury.

The revised one-end zone rules are here.  If only they had, I dunno, a year to figure all of this out.  Or decades of experience with the Chicago Bears playing in that park to have some sort of reference on how to set up a football field there.  Or at least did a simple Google Image search like I did:

Instead of going out to right field, it went out to left.  It was still a tight squeeze in the end zone on the left, but only at one corner. And of course, back in those days there weren’t a ton of fade routes, what with all of that three yards and a cloud of dust stuff. The current alignment has the wall running along the entire back of the end zone and super fast dudes will be streaking all over the place.  My guess, though, is that under the old alignment they would have been just hunky dory.

Ultimately, using one end zone is the right call, because there’s just too much risk of injury having a brick wall in the back of the end zone.  But the fact that they’re just figuring this all out now, 24 hours before game time, is pretty pathetic.

Cubs won’t make Kyle Schwarber available in trade talks

Kyle Schwarber
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Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that the Cubs won’t deal Kyle Schwarber this winter, despite multiple inquires from teams around the league. Schwarber is approaching his first year of arbitration and will remain under team control for another three seasons before reaching free agency in 2022.

The decision comes on the heels of one of the strongest seasons of the 25-year-old outfielder’s short career. Over 137 games and 510 PA for the Cubs, he proved a passable defender in left field and batted .238/.356/.467 with 26 home runs, an .823 OPS, and 3.2 fWAR in 2018. He also led the National League in intentional walks, with 20, and bumped up his total walks from 59 in 2017 to 78.

Despite his marked improvements from previous years, Schwarber’s performance still left something to be desired — specifically against left-handed pitchers, who held the slugger to a paltry .224/.352/.303 with four extra-base hits across 91 PA. Still, it’s evident the Cubs feel Schwarber is capable of strengthening his splits in the years to come, and they might stand to get more value from him on the field than they would in a trade this offseason.

Of course, that’s not to say the Cubs intend to pass the Winter Meetings in total silence, especially as they’ll be seeking bullpen and catching depth in advance of their 2019 run at the division title. As club president Theo Epstein remarked last week, “We’re certainly open and active in trade talks with a lot of deals that usually don’t come to fruition. So, we may make some trades. We could make big ones that transform the roster. We may make smaller complementary ones. But there’s certain things we’d like to accomplish.”