Sandy Alderson not sold on Josh Thole as everyday catcher

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Before they were fired Jerry Manuel and Omar Minaya both indicated that 24-year-old Josh Thole would likely be the Mets’ starting catcher in 2011 after playing regularly down the stretch as a rookie, but new general manager Sandy Alderson isn’t quite as sold on the idea.

Alderson said yesterday that the Mets are “thin” at the position are “looking for more catching” while explaining that “it would be a little bit premature if I were to make a judgment on Thole without ever actually having seen him play.”

Here’s a little more of Alderson on Thole:

I’ve heard nothing but good things about Josh. So I expect that he’s going to be a very important piece for us. I’m not making a judgment about Thole as the No. 1 or No. 2. Whether he plays the majority of games or not, we’re going to need additional catching help. So I think in part it’s going to depend on what I hear and what others think of Thole. And the second is going to depend on what’s available out there otherwise. But we’re very happy that we have him. Exactly what his role will be is a little undetermined.

Thole is a left-handed hitter, so it would make sense for the Mets to pair him with a right-handed-hitting veteran backup and re-signing Henry Blanco would seemingly be a good fit. I do think he deserves a shot at the clear-cut starting job, though.

Thole doesn’t have much power, but he hit .277 with a .357 on-base percentage and 25/24 K/BB ratio in 227 plate appearances as a rookie after posting a .376 on-base percentage in six seasons as a minor leaguer. He’s never going to be a star, but for a team with plenty of other holes to fill a 24-year-old catcher with good on-base skills making the league minimum is worth leaving alone.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.