The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Seattle Mariners

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Our last entry of the series. Ah, memories. It seems like it was only last Tuesday when we began this thing . . .

The Best: Call me crazy, but I loved the old trident M on the caps. It looked better with the star behind it than the original look , but like so many other expansion teams, be it the Angels, the Brewers or the Expos, a unique logo — as opposed to a near-generic letter — is the absolute best way to make up for not having a century of history behind you. Or rather, it is your history, Seattle, and it’s not something that you should hide from simply because it wasn’t around before World War II.

Ultimately, though, that’s just a cap. The jerseys of that era were kind of blah. And really, since then, the jerseys have been kind of blah.  I guess if they could somehow incorporate the star-trident-M with something like this they’d be optimizing things, but I still believe that the Mariners’ best uniforms are in their future, not their past.

The Worst: The era of the big yellow S on the caps may have been one of the laziest designs in baseball history. “Well, we’re in Seattle. Let’s put an ‘S’ on there, OK boys?  No, no need to make it look good or fancy or anything. Just a yellow S. We have more important things to do today.”

Assessment: The Mariners have at times been the worst team in baseball, and for one year at least, they were the best team in baseball.  Never, however, have their uniforms reached heights or depths of any significance whatsoever. Kind of sad really.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.