The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Seattle Mariners

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Our last entry of the series. Ah, memories. It seems like it was only last Tuesday when we began this thing . . .

The Best: Call me crazy, but I loved the old trident M on the caps. It looked better with the star behind it than the original look , but like so many other expansion teams, be it the Angels, the Brewers or the Expos, a unique logo — as opposed to a near-generic letter — is the absolute best way to make up for not having a century of history behind you. Or rather, it is your history, Seattle, and it’s not something that you should hide from simply because it wasn’t around before World War II.

Ultimately, though, that’s just a cap. The jerseys of that era were kind of blah. And really, since then, the jerseys have been kind of blah.  I guess if they could somehow incorporate the star-trident-M with something like this they’d be optimizing things, but I still believe that the Mariners’ best uniforms are in their future, not their past.

The Worst: The era of the big yellow S on the caps may have been one of the laziest designs in baseball history. “Well, we’re in Seattle. Let’s put an ‘S’ on there, OK boys?  No, no need to make it look good or fancy or anything. Just a yellow S. We have more important things to do today.”

Assessment: The Mariners have at times been the worst team in baseball, and for one year at least, they were the best team in baseball.  Never, however, have their uniforms reached heights or depths of any significance whatsoever. Kind of sad really.

David Price exits start with flu-like symptoms

David Price
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Red Sox southpaw David Price was lifted in the first inning of Saturday’s game against the Astros. While there was some initial concern that he might have trigged the elbow tendinitis that has been affecting him lately, manager Alex Cora was quick to clarify the situation as the result of “flu-like symptoms.”

Price pitched just 2/3 of an inning, inducing a first-pitch fly out from Aledmys Díaz, striking out Alex Bregman, and allowing a single to Michael Brantley before making his departure from the mound. He was replaced by rookie right-hander Colten Brewer.

Barring further complications, Price will likely stay on track to make his next scheduled start during the Red Sox’ upcoming road trip. Entering Saturday’s match-up, the 33-year-old lefty carried a 2-2 record in seven starts with a 3.29 ERA, 2.2 BB/9, and 10.1 SO/9 across 41 innings in 2019.

Following Price’s removal, the Red Sox are still tied 0-0 with the Astros in the fifth.