The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Minnesota Twins

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The Best: They were unchanged — and looking good — from 1960 through 1971 before moving on to the land of the double knits.  Which still didn’t look horrible, although they were a bit generic. The best look was that classic look, which is nicely reproduced in the new home alternates. I like the new roadies better than the actual classics, though, thanks to the “Minnesota” on them as opposed to “Twins.”

The WorstThe World Series years pinstripes with the M on the hats. I know they have their fans — especially any Twins backer under the age of 40 or so — but this is a personal, visceral thing for me. Men wearing those things knocked Alan Trammell and the Tigers out of the 1987 playoffs. Men wearing those things picked up and threw the 1991 Braves out of the World Series. Seeing them causes me pain, and that’s without accounting for the fact that pinstripes on gray uniforms look terrible and that no team has ever in its history eschewed an epic logo like those 80s and 90s Twins teams eschewed the interlocking “TC.” That “M” cap they had for so long would be like the Yankees getting rid of their “NY” for a big block N.

Assessment: The Twins are living proof that the uniform a team wears during its greatest success is not necessarily its best uniform.

Nationals promote 19-year-old prospect Juan Soto

SportsLogos.net
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The Nationals recalled 19-year-old outfield prospect Juan Soto from Double-A Harrisburg on Sunday, per a team announcement. Soto is poised to become the youngest player in the league once he makes his official debut with the club, and the Nationals’ first teenager to enter the majors since Bryce Harper made his first appearance back in 2012.

Entering the 2018 season, Soto was ranked no. 2 in the Nationals’ system and 15th overall. He’s certainly lived up to the hype during his first two years of pro ball, blazing through Single-A, High-A and Double-A levels in 2018 alone. While he logged just eight games at the Double-A level prior to his promotion to the majors, he proved consistent across all three levels this spring and slashed a cumulative .362/.462/.757 with 14 home runs and a 1.218 OPS in 182 plate appearances.

It’s not entirely clear how soon or in what capacity the Nationals will utilize their youngest player, but Soto’s tear through the minors is sure to pave the road for a few opportunities on the big-league level. He’ll be available off the bench for Sunday’s series finale against the Dodgers.