The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Kansas City Royals

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The Best: The home uniform has been fairly constant, ranging from a no-number-on-the-front version to a numbered version, and switching between pullover and button-up as trends have dictated. It looks good in all of those guises, but I think I prefer the button-up, numbered version — which has been in use for most of the past 25 years — the best. Just a nice, clean, sharp uniform.

The worst: I like their classic powder blues just fine, but they really screwed things up when they brought them back a couple of years ago. Tops only, a light blue cap, and using them at home? Booo!  All blue, on the road or GTFO. And the dark blue jersey on the road is weak sauce too, though better than the current light blue usage, and better than a lot of teams that go with the solid tops on the road. The worst ever is less an aesthetic choice than a philosophical one: vests and black accents. What an unfortunate nod to cynical trends.

Assessment: the Royals of my youth were the class organization in the American League. I kind of hated them for that, but I always thought they looked good. In both inspiring such hatred and in looking good, they kind of sound like the Dodgers, no?  Kind of look a lot like them too.  There are worse looks to emulate. As long as they keep it nice and straight forward, they’ll always look good, even when they’re playing bad.

Mike Trout, Willson Contreras homer, A.L. leads 2-1 after three

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Aaron Judge did it first, Mike Trout did it next.

The best player in baseball — who spent the bottom of the second mic’d-up and talking to Joe Buck and John Smoltz about the weather and stuff — came to bat second in the top of the third inning, facing Mets pitcher Jacob deGrom. deGrom is used to pitching with no run support at this point so it’s not like he was uncomfortable I imagine, but you can only get so comfortable when Mike Trout is in the box. Trout took deGrom downtown. Or at the very least to left field to make it 2-0, American League.

The National League took that run right back in the bottom of the third. With the Rays’ Blake Snell in the game, Willson Contreras of the Cubs led off and he wasted no time, depositing Snell’s first pitch just over the railing in left to make it 2-1, American League.