The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Chicago White Sox

9 Comments

No team has messed around as much as the Chicago White Sox. You name it, and they’ve done it: black, white, red, blue, classic, modern, pinstriped, plain. There has been a lot of bad in there, no question, but a lot of good too.

The Best: Chicago more or less had it together before the mid 1970s, and have more or less had it together since the early 90s. I may be in the minority in really liking their red and white pinstriped look. I mean, this looks good, doesn’t it? And I’m open to the suggestion that no team ever looked better in light blue road uniforms than the mid-60s Sox did. Still, I have to admit that the Sox look best in black and white.

The Worst. You think I’m gonna go with the obvious choice, don’t you? Well, I’m not. Why? Because they only wore the shorts for one half of a double header, so it’s not like it was a usual thing. Obviously awful — and how were they supposed to slide in those things? — but it would be unfair to the many, many other bad looks the Sox have sported over the years to pick that one. I mean really, that big baggy look they normally wore during the late 70s was plenty awful even in the long pants version. But for my money they’re not the worst. My choice? The doubleknits they rocked in the early 80s. Just hideous, really, and that would be the case even if they never tried to stuff Greg Luzinski in them. I mean, at least he looked moderately comfortable when they let him wear his shirt un-tucked.

Assessment: I know the White Sox are the poster children for awful uniform choices, but none of their looks — even the shorts — were as bad as a team I’m going to mention tomorrow. Because for as aesthetically un-pleasing as the White Sox could often be, at least they were trying interesting things out of a sense of whimsy or adventure.

Brett Cecil placed on 10-day injured list due to Carpal Tunnel syndrome

Hannah Foslien/Getty Images
3 Comments

On Monday, Cardinals reliever Brett Cecil was placed on the 10-day injured list due to Carpal Tunnel syndrome. Cecil, who notably lost 42 pounds since the end of the 2018 season, was having trouble with his mechanics throughout spring training and only logged two official Grapefruit League innings.

Cecil, 32, is entering the third year of his four-year, $30.5 million contract. He struggled last year, finishing with a 6.89 ERA and a 19/25 K/BB ratio in 32 2/3 innings. The lefty dealt with shoulder and foot injuries during the season as well.

The Cardinals bolstered the bullpen in December, signing lefty Andrew Miller to a two-year, $25 million deal. It would be nice to have a healthy and effective Cecil, but the high-leverage workload will be managed by Miller and Jordan Hicks as well as Alex Reyes.

Cecil was among a handful of Cardinals to hit the injured list on Monday, joining Carlos Martínez (right shoulder cuff strain), Jedd Gyorko (right calf strain), Luke Gregerson (right shoulder impingement), and Justin Williams (right hand second metacarpal fracture).