Terry Collins had a DUI in 2002, but does that mean anything?

2 Comments

This is news to me. Joe Janish of Mets Today has information about Terry Collins’ 2002 DUI arrest in Augusta, Georgia.

Here’s part of the story that ran in the Augusta Chronicle, which I was also able to find on Baseball America.

Former major league manager Terry Collins was arrested early Thursday morning and charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, according to the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office.

The 53-year-old Collins, in his first year as minor league field coordinator with the Los Angeles Dodgers, was stopped by police on the 3100 block of Washington Road, a major Augusta thoroughfare, around 2 a.m.

Collins, who managed the Astros (1994-96) and Angels (1997-99), was also charged with operating an unsafe vehicle and driving without a license on his person.

Janish writes that the purpose of the post was not to smear Collins’ reputation, but to put everyone on an equal playing field. And by “everyone,” he means Wally Backman. We all know about Backman’s legal troubles by now, so to ignore Collins’ past mistakes would be pretty hypocritical, but the fact that Collins also has a DUI arrest doesn’t Backman anymore qualified for the Mets’ managerial job than he was yesterday.

As a Mets fan, I’m not leaning towards one candidate in particular here. I felt the same way back in 2004 before Omar Minaya settled on Willie Randolph. Part of this is because Bobby Valentine is the only potential candidate who would get me excited (what can I say, he’s the last manager to get the Mets to the World Series), but also because I care much more about the composition of the team on the field. But, honestly, comparing Backman’s baseball resume to that of Collins is largely apples and oranges.

That won’t stop Backman supporters from blaming the media if he doesn’t get a second interview, which is the exact reason why I decided to post this information this morning. I want everyone to be aware that Collins had a DUI in 2002. I hope the beat reporters and New York sports talk radio jump all over this story. If, despite all that, Collins comes back for a second interview and eventually ends up getting the job, it will tell you that Sandy Alderson’s decision had more to do with baseball than anything else.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

Elsa/Getty Images
2 Comments

Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?