The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Colorado Rockies

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The Best: With the exception of the most minor of variations, they’ve always looked the same. A few fewer purple accents now. The vest.  The substitution of “Colorado” on their road jerseys instead of a repeat of “Rockies.”  Which was a good move, because teams should always have the city name on their road jerseys rather than the nickname. I can’t think of an exception to this at the moment, and any team still doing the nickname-on-the-roadies things should probably cut it out now.  If I have to pick a best, fine, here you go.  It’s all basically the same.

Worst: This look was  . . . special. Overall, though, I’m not enamoured with the Rockies’ uniforms and never have been. Their color scheme is clearly the result of an early 90s fixation with black which followed the marketing success of Los Angeles Raiders hats and the like.  The purple accents are of that time too, though we’ll cut the Rockies a bit of slack due to the mountains’ majesty and all of that.  I can’t help but think that they’d do something different if they were launched in 2003 instead of 1993, and I can’t look at them without thinking of David Nied and Color Me Badd and every other creative and competitive dead end that was popular for a brief time when I was a sophomore in college.

Suggestions: Someone with the Rockies’ organization should be forced to get in their car and drive around the Rocky Mountains for a week or two. When they get back, they should try to incorporate some of that raw beauty into the Rockies’ color palette.

Alex Bregman shows how easy it is to manufacture “controversy” in baseball

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In most sports it takes legitimate trash talk to create off-day “controversy.” In baseball, it takes the weakest sauce. We saw how weak that sauce was yesterday.

Alex Bregman and the Houston Astros are going to face off against Nate Eovaldi and the Boston Red Sox in Game 3 of the ALCS tonight. It’s worth noting that earlier this season, they hit back-to-back-to-back home runs off of Eovaldi when he was pitching for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Yesterday, in an act which was likely somewhat inspired by self-motivation, somewhat inspired by getting in Eovaldi’s head and somewhat inspired by a simple interest in having fun, Bregman took the video of those back-to-back-to-back homers off of Eovaldi and posted it to his Instagram:

Of course, since this is baseball, where even farting off-key can be construed as “showing up” the opposition or somehow disrespecting the game, it became a thing. Or at least people tried to make it become a thing.

Indeed, it took them a bit to find someone who would help them make it a thing, because Eovaldi himself didn’t care about it a bit, nor did Astros manager A.J. Hinch or Red Sox manager Alex Cora. Eventually, however, they hit pay dirt. Here’s Sox infielder Steve Pearce talking to WEEI.com:

“Wow. I don’t know why he would do that. We do our talking on the field. If he wants to run his mouth now we’ll see who is talking at the end of the series.”

My guess is that almost no one on the planet, Steve Pearce included, would care about this in a vacuum or if they allowed themselves to think through it for more than a second. Baseball culture, though — and let’s be clear about it, baseball media culture — has conditioned most of its players and participants to think that stuff like this is supposed to be controversial, so it actually takes effort not to start dancing to this kind of tune on auto-pilot.

Kudos to Hinch, Cora and Eolvaldi for exerting that effort and not dancing to it. To the press that automatically sought out comment on this and Pearce who dutifully gave it: hey, I get it. It’s hard to resist one’s conditioning. Maybe you’ll be able to resist it next time.