The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Milwaukee Brewers

11 Comments

The Best: The 70s and the early 80s were a disaster for so many teams, but man, I really like the old Harvey’s Wallbangers look. Lose the pullovers if you must — that’s what they do for throwback day now — and I suppose the powder blue is negotiable, but the Brewers without pinstripes, yellow accents, and that mitt logo on the cap just aren’t the Brewers to me.

Worst:
I don’t like what they wear today. It looks like a uniform designed by a focus group. It’s stock baseball clothing: “Tasteful, Inoffensive Ballclub #2” or something.  Milwaukee is a city with a colorful history and citizenry. Their uniforms should have a some pizazz. More to the point, at one time they sported a definitive look that was unmistakably their own and which no one had a problem with that I’m aware of, and they shouldn’t be rocking any other looks.  Oh, and since we’re going with the entire franchise’s history, can we stipulate that the Seattle Pilots looked terrible? To the extent we have any affection for those duds — including the scrambled eggs on the cap — it’s misleading nostalgia based on our love of “Ball Four,” not because they stood up on their own merits.

Assessment: I know some Brewers fans have a prickly relationship with the Yount-Molitor era uniforms, thinking that embracing them is to look backwards rather than forwards. But really, it’s just clothes. As long as they’re looking ahead on the important stuff — who to hire how to build their team — I think they can be excused for returning to their classic look. Not that they will. Just wishin’.

Please trade Manny Machado already, will ya?

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Manny Machado has been on the trading block for some time now, and he’s obviously a highly sought-after player who will command a nice haul for the Orioles if and when they deal him. Until they do that, however, let us talk for a moment about how to read a given trade rumor that gets tweeted or reported out into the ether.

Let’s look at the latest one, shall we? It goes like this:

At the outset, let me be clear about something: I do not doubt this reporting. Heyman is well-sourced, and I’m sure he’s hearing this exact thing. But so too are other reporters reporting other things, such as a rumor that floated around yesterday that the Phillies were in the lead. And so too are the guys who, several days ago, reported that a Machado trade was “on the 10 yard line.” Yesterday some random person on Twitter, claiming they had inside info, reached out to me to tell me that the O’s and the Phillies had a “handshake deal” in place (which sounded totally bogus, BTW). It’s all so imminent and urgent-sounding.

It’s urgent-sounding not because fast-paced and urgent activity is happening. Some GMs are texting one another, just like they always do. Some are making offers and waiting to hear from the Orioles, some are getting counters from the Orioles and are considering them. The GMs of two teams competing for Machado are not, themselves, in communication. In that respect it is decidedly not like a horse race or a football game.

The Orioles want it to be one, though, and make no mistake, that’s where these rumors are coming from.

The Orioles have a vested interest in the Dodgers, Brewers and Phillies upping their bids to beat out the other suitors, and it’s hard not to see all of these reports as stuff the Orioles are telling reporters in order to get the other clubs to think they’re going to miss out. It’s the Orioles and the Orioles alone who have a vested interest in this appearing more like a horse race — or a football game — and thus are cultivating horse race coverage. Whether it’s coordinated or whether it’s just random people in Baltimore telling what they know to reporters I have no idea, but that’s what this is.

That’s interesting to me as a media guy, and I guess it’s interesting to fans of the teams involved, but it’s probably good to remember that it’s less baseball news, proper, than it is a team using the media to get leverage.