The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Milwaukee Brewers

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The Best: The 70s and the early 80s were a disaster for so many teams, but man, I really like the old Harvey’s Wallbangers look. Lose the pullovers if you must — that’s what they do for throwback day now — and I suppose the powder blue is negotiable, but the Brewers without pinstripes, yellow accents, and that mitt logo on the cap just aren’t the Brewers to me.

Worst:
I don’t like what they wear today. It looks like a uniform designed by a focus group. It’s stock baseball clothing: “Tasteful, Inoffensive Ballclub #2” or something.  Milwaukee is a city with a colorful history and citizenry. Their uniforms should have a some pizazz. More to the point, at one time they sported a definitive look that was unmistakably their own and which no one had a problem with that I’m aware of, and they shouldn’t be rocking any other looks.  Oh, and since we’re going with the entire franchise’s history, can we stipulate that the Seattle Pilots looked terrible? To the extent we have any affection for those duds — including the scrambled eggs on the cap — it’s misleading nostalgia based on our love of “Ball Four,” not because they stood up on their own merits.

Assessment: I know some Brewers fans have a prickly relationship with the Yount-Molitor era uniforms, thinking that embracing them is to look backwards rather than forwards. But really, it’s just clothes. As long as they’re looking ahead on the important stuff — who to hire how to build their team — I think they can be excused for returning to their classic look. Not that they will. Just wishin’.

Astros clinch postseason berth with 11-3 win over Angels

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No surprise here: The Astros are headed back to the postseason to defend their title following a landslide 11-3 win over the Angels on Friday. This figures to be their third playoff run since 2015, though they have yet to wrap up the AL West with a division title.

First baseman Yuli Gurriel led the charge on Friday, smashing a grand slam in the first inning and tacking on a two-run homer in the second and RBI single in the fifth to help the Astros to a seven-run lead. The Angels eventually returned fire, first with Mike Trout‘s 418-foot homer in the sixth, then with an RBI hit from Francisco Arcia in the seventh, but they couldn’t close the gap in time to overtake the Astros.

On the mound, right-hander Gerrit Cole clinched his 15th win of the year after holding the Angels to seven innings of three-run, 12-strikeout ball. His sixth strikeout of the night — delivered on an 83.1-MPH knuckle curveball to Kaleb Cowart — also marked the 1,000th strikeout of his career to date. He was backed by flawless performances by lefty reliever Tony Sipp and rookie right-hander Dean Deetz, both of whom turned in scoreless innings as the offense barreled toward an 11-3 finish with Jake Marisnick‘s sac bunt and George Springer‘s three-run shot in the eighth.

Despite having qualified for the playoffs, the Astros still carry a magic number of 6 as they look to clinch a third straight division title. They’re currently up against the Athletics, who entered Friday’s contest against the Twins just four games back of first place in the AL West.