The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Florida Marlins

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The Best: Look, when you’ve only been around since 1993, there’s not a ton to work with. They didn’t  have anything historical from which to draw, so a lot of good modern classics are non-starters. At the same time, they began business after the Era of the Unfortunate (a/k/a the 70s) concluded so they don’t have anything to run from either.  As a result, we’re dealing with a very limited spectrum here.  I suppose they look as good now as they ever have, but that’s not saying much.

Worst: Season one’s teal nightmare still causes me to wake up screaming. Also, they, like so many other teams, seem to enjoy looking like they’re perpetually in batting practice, what with liberal use of black alternate jerseys. Note to every baseball team: you can still sell black shirts to all of the young hip kids you want buying them without making your baseball team wear them on the field as an organizational marketing arm.

Assessment: I understand, but I really wish the Marlins would break away from tropical colors. The Heat did it, so there’s obviously no law that says you gotta look like the Dolphins if you play in South Florida. Here’s a suggestion: ever seen a real marlin? They’re dark blue and silver-gray with some minor orange accenting. Think about it.

Report: Indians, Padres still talking about starting pitching trade

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Indians and Padres are still discussing a potential trade for a starting pitcher, namely Corey Kluber or Trevor Bauer. Rosenthal adds that a deal isn’t close and is unlikely to occur before Opening Day. The Padres are balking at the Indians’ asking prices for the two starters.

The Padres could certainly use an ace at the top of the rotation. With the addition of Manny Machado, the lineup is looking decent, but beyond Joey Lucchesi, the starting pitching doesn’t inspire confidence.

Kluber, who turns 33 years old next month, has club options for the next two seasons at $13.5 million and $14 million with $1 million buyouts each. Last year, the right-hander finished third in AL Cy Young balloting, finishing 20-7 with a 2.89 ERA and a 222/34 K/BB ratio in 215 innings.

Bauer, 28, is earning $13 million this season and will enter his fourth and final year of arbitration heading into 2020. Last year, Bauer went 12-6 with a 2.21 ERA and a 221/57 K/BB ratio across 175 1/3 innings.

The Indians are the prohibitive favorites in the AL Central once again, but that has as much to do with the mediocrity of the rest of the division as the Indians’ commitment to competing. If the Indians were to trade either or both starters, that would be good news for the Twins, who are projected to be 15 games worse than the Indians but still finish in second place, according to PECOTA from Baseball Prospectus.