The Best and Worst Uniforms of All Time: The Florida Marlins

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The Best: Look, when you’ve only been around since 1993, there’s not a ton to work with. They didn’t  have anything historical from which to draw, so a lot of good modern classics are non-starters. At the same time, they began business after the Era of the Unfortunate (a/k/a the 70s) concluded so they don’t have anything to run from either.  As a result, we’re dealing with a very limited spectrum here.  I suppose they look as good now as they ever have, but that’s not saying much.

Worst: Season one’s teal nightmare still causes me to wake up screaming. Also, they, like so many other teams, seem to enjoy looking like they’re perpetually in batting practice, what with liberal use of black alternate jerseys. Note to every baseball team: you can still sell black shirts to all of the young hip kids you want buying them without making your baseball team wear them on the field as an organizational marketing arm.

Assessment: I understand, but I really wish the Marlins would break away from tropical colors. The Heat did it, so there’s obviously no law that says you gotta look like the Dolphins if you play in South Florida. Here’s a suggestion: ever seen a real marlin? They’re dark blue and silver-gray with some minor orange accenting. Think about it.

Report: Hanley Ramirez “eyed” in federal and state investigation

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Former Red Sox first baseman Hanley Ramirez is reportedly being “eyed” in an ongoing federal and state investigation, per Michele McPhee of ABC News. McPhee did not elaborate on the exact nature of the investigation itself, but provided a few more details during an interview with 98.5 The Sports Hub on Friday:

“Obviously, I know absolutely nothing about sports or Hanley Ramirez’s stats, but what I do know is crime,” McPhee said. “And there has been some reports about a FaceTime phone call that was made between a man during a car stop. After that car stop, police recovered a significant amount of drugs. And during that car stop, the suspect claimed that one of the items found in the vehicle belonged to Hanley Ramirez and then FaceTimed [Ramirez] in front of police. And that car stop coordinated with the timing of his release from the Red Sox.”

McPhee further clarified that she thinks the suspect — who was reportedly transporting 435 grams of fentanyl and a “large amount” of crack cocaine — was tied to “a sweeping federal case involving a substantial ring that’s being operated out of Lawrence, Massachusetts.”

Ramirez, the Red Sox, and Major League Baseball have all denied knowledge of any current investigation. According to the Boston Globe’s Alex Speier, Red Sox VP of media relations Kevin Gregg insisted that Ramirez had been dropped from the team for baseball reasons alone and had not been made aware of an investigation at the time of his release.

“Hanley has no knowledge of any of the allegations contained in this media report and he is not aware of any investigation,” the infielder’s agent, Adam Katz, added Friday.

The 34-year-old Ramirez was designated for assignment on May 25 and became a free agent on June 1. Prior to his release, he batted .254/.313/.395 over 195 plate appearances, 302 shy of the 497-PA threshold he would have needed to cross in order to activate his vesting option for 2019. He’s still owed the remainder of his $22 million salary for 2018.