Scott Podsednik opts out of Dodgers deal and becomes a free agent

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When the Dodgers exercised their half of Scott Podsednik’s mutual option earlier this week the assumption was that the speedy outfielder would soon do the same and accept a $2 million salary for 2011, but today Podsednik declined his half of the option and became a free agent.

Podsednik earned $1.75 million this season and was paid less than $1 million in both 2008 and 2009, so $2 million seemed like a pretty good salary for a 35-year-old left fielder with a .382 slugging percentage.

Of course, it only takes one team focusing on his speed and veteran-ness above his lack of production to make opting out of the Dodgers deal a sound move for Podsednik.

For all his speed Podsednik isn’t a legitimate option defensively in center field and was thrown out on 15 of 50 steal attempts in addition to annually being among the league leaders in times picked off. He gets on base at a decent clip and has good range in left field, but I’m just not sure how many teams are in the market for a .725 OPS left fielder at this point.

He may find another offer in the $2 million range, but sticking with the Dodgers was probably his best shot at everyday playing time.

For the second straight year, Chris Sale, Max Scherzer match up as All-Star Game starters

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For the second year in a row, the All-Star Game will feature a starting pitching matchup of Chris Sale vs. Max Scherzer. The two were just announced at a press conference at Nationals Park.

This, in fact, will be Sale’s third straight start of the Midsummer Classic, as he faced off against Johnny Cueto of the National League in 2016. It’s Scherzer’s third start in an All-Star Game overall, as he got the starting nod for the American League back in 2013 against Matt Harvey.

Sale is 10-4 with a 2.23 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 188/31 in 129 inning pitched. He leads the American League in ERA, strikeouts and strikeouts per nine innings pitched, with 13.1.

Scherzer is 12-5 with a 2.41 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 182/34 in 134.2 innings pitched. He leads the National League in wins, complete games, shutouts, strikeouts, innings, batters faced, WHIP, hits per nine innings allowed and strikeouts per nine innings pitched.

Because it’s the All-Star Game neither will notch a win, even if one could get a loss. Still, it’s a matchup of the two best pitchers going in 2018 and, with a tip of the cap to Clayton Kershaw, the two best starting pitchers of this era.