Aramis Ramirez exercises $14.6 million option for 2011

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For a brief moment Aramis Ramirez dropped some hints about possibly declining his $14.6 million player option for 2011, but presumably his agent (or really anyone with a functional brain) took him aside and said something like, “Uh, you just had your worst season since 2002, maybe take the money.”

Ramirez made it official today, exercising the $14.6 million option for 2011 while also forcing the Cubs to either pay him $16 million or a $2 million buyout in 2012. In other words, by exercising his option Ramirez guarantees himself another $16.6 million and also delays free agency by a year to potentially recoup some of the value he’s lost.

He’s obviously never going to get another contract like the five-year, $75 million deal the Cubs gave him in November of 2006, but if Ramirez returns to his pre-2010 levels he’s definitely capable of securing a multi-year deal for a ton of money next winter. In his first six full seasons in Chicago he hit .303/.368/.551 with an average of 35 homers and 115 RBIs per 150 games, and after a horrendous first half this year he quietly hit .276/.321/.526 with 15 homers and 51 RBIs in the second half.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.