One more trademark infringement lawsuit. This one filed by the, um, Brooklyn Dodgers?

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I said before that I understood the rationale behind the Rangers or the Phillies going after people for using their trademarks or copyrighted slogans and all of that.  But this one seems about 52 years and 3000 miles too late: the Dodgers are suing a Brooklyn hamburger vendor for using a script “Brooklyn” design in its logo that looks like the old Dodgers script.

The article talks about the legal and practical issues with this — the hamburger guy registered the trademark and, the Dodgers’ rights to “Brooklyn” appear to be limited to apparel sales and, you know, the team left New York over half a century ago. But the best part are the quotes from other local businessmen — and there are many of them — who use similar script “Brooklyns” in their logo:

“Oh, f— them! What do they have to do with Brooklyn?” said Lindi, 41. “They left Brooklyn years ago. We don’t let nobody push us around. Change our logo? Oh, fuhgeddaboudit. Tell them to come down here, we’ll straighten it all out.”
Wait, did the Daily News actually find a real person to say this, or did they file their story from Brooklyn central casting?

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.