Mets must now begin searching for a new manager

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Now that the Mets have locked up new general manager Sandy Alderson, it’s time to begin the search for a skipper.

Alderson is expected to lead the hunt and told Steve Popper of the Bergen Record on Friday that he is hoping for someone with a little fire and a decent level of independence.

“I think that we’re looking for somebody that fits intellectual requirements, but also intuitive and emotional ones,” Alderson said. “That manager may have experience. He may not have experience. We’re very open-minded about it at this point. But I do want to emphasize that whomever is selected is going to be the manager and making those decisions. Needs to have a certain level of independence, obviously, in order to accomplish what he needs to accomplish.”

The Mets have not yet begun speaking with candidates because of their search for a GM, but possibilities include Rangers hitting coach Clint Hurdle, minor league manager Wally Backman, ESPN analyst Bobby Valentine and current Mets scout Bob Melvin.  Former Mariners skipper Don Wakamatsu is also expected to get a look.

Managers have very little impact on the outcome of a game, let alone an entire season, but in New York it’s imperative to have a guy with thick skin and a guy that doesn’t mind the spotlight.  The new Citi Field has yet to host a playoff baseball game and the Mets are hoping to change that under the guidance of new leadership.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.