Joe Girardi, Dave Eiland had a falling out midseason

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When the Yankees fired pitching coach Dave Eiland this fall after their run in the American League Championship Series was put to a stop, general manager Brian Cashman called it his own decision.  He said it was a “private” and “personal matter” that led to Eiland being let go and did not answer further questions.  Now new details are trickling out.

Andrew Marchand of ESPN New York heard from a source this weekend that Eiland’s tarnished relationship with manager Joe Girardi, and not Cashman, is what likely spelled the end for the veteran Yankee coach.

Eiland felt that his “opinions were being deemphasized” when he returned from a month-long leave of absence in June, according to Marchand’s source, and frustration likely grew out of A.J. Burnett’s consistently poor showings in the second half of the 2010 season.

So what does this all mean?  Not much, really.  Eiland is already gone and the Yankees aren’t going to get into further details of why he was let go because they don’t have to.  It does make one think that Girardi might have a little more say in organizational moves than previously thought.  He soured on the guy, the guy was fired.

The Yankees have not yet settled on a replacement for Eiland.  Former Mets pitching coach Rick Peterson is in the running, as is A’s former pitching coach Curt Young.  Leo Mazzone’s name has been thrown around as well.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.