Does the manager matter more in New York than in most places?

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John Harper warns new Mets GM Sandy Alderson to be careful about his managerial pick. Why? Because things are totally different in New York:

In New York, the manager matters more than most places. The scrutiny on every decision demands a certain type of personality, as does the magnitude of dealing with the media – as well as creating the right clubhouse culture . . .  Joe Girardi has survived and even thrived to some extent despite being a control freak who gives the impression that he would be more comfortable undergoing a colonoscopy than he is dealing with the New York media on a daily basis.
I’d say there’s an argument that, in New York, a manager matters even less.  What other city has seen a team fire a successful manager only to have the team not miss a beat with his successor more often than New York?  Houk won after Stengel was let go. Lemon won after Martin. Girardi won after Torre. The guy in the dugout has probably mattered less in New York than anywhere.
Of course, all of those examples are the Yankees, not the Mets. But the Mets have been awful under a lot of different managers. Without fundamental changes in how the team does business, they’ll continue to be awful.  Which suggests to me that the manager is the least of the Mets’ concerns right now. It’s Alderson’s moves and his vision that will make the difference.
Is temperament irrelevant? Of course not. But whether Sandy Alderson hires a manager who can deal with the New York media is something that should concern the New York media more than it should concern Sandy Alderson.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.