Wait — did 2009 actually happen?

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I’m sorry to be fixated on Yankees stuff this afternoon, but apparently watching two teams that aren’t the Yankees play in the World Series is driving the New York writers crazy.

Lupica’s column today is about how, for all the money the Yankees have spent in the past decade, they only have the one World Series title to show for it. Or, put differently, only one “[s]ince Mike Piazza hit one into Bernie Williams’ glove at the end of the 2000 Subway Series.” But I guess a decade is technically a decade and who are we to dwell on something that happened 11 seasons out? Ancient history.

Anyway, this is my favorite passage:

Two years ago, the Yankees spent $425 million on Mark Teixeira, CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett. When those guys finally put the Yankees back on top in 2009, we heard it was part of a grand master plan. Only now the Yankees get pistol-whipped by the Rangers, and the immediate thought – demand? – to make things right is to go spend another $125 million, or whatever it is going to take, to get the best pitcher out there this year, Cliff Lee.
Only in New York could someone caveat-away a one-year-old World Series title like that. It’s as if it didn’t matter and the plan that led to that title was a big fraud or something.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.