Rangers bench Vladimir Guerrero for Game 2

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Vladimir Guerrero made a rare appearance in the outfield last night because the Rangers were playing under NL rules in San Francisco, but after multiple miscues defensively manager Ron Washington has decided to bench the nine-time All-Star and former MVP for Game 2 tonight.

David Murphy replaces Guerrero in the lineup and will start in left field, with Nelson Cruz moving from left field to right field. Cruz will also take over for Guerrero in the cleanup spot behind Josh Hamilton.

And it’s absolutely the right move.

Guerrero didn’t just look bad in right field last night, he looked horrendous. It was sad to watch. Plus, it’s not clear that Guerrero is even a better option than Murphy offensively at this point, at least against a right-handed pitcher like tonight’s Giants starter, Matt Cain.

In his prime Guerrero was a middle-of-the-order monster regardless of the handedness of the pitcher, but this season at age 35 he hit .287/.328/.482 versus righties. That production is right around average for a corner outfielder, which makes Guerrero solidly below average once his defense is factored in. He also struggled overall in the second half and has produced a measly .601 OPS in the playoffs.

Meanwhile, the left-handed-hitting Murphy batted .298/.368/.479 versus righties this season, which is 37 points of OPS better than Guerrero. Murphy is also an above-average defender. Based purely on current ability rather than reputations and names my guess is that Ron Washington would have made this move for Game 1, but he at least deserves some credit for not making the same mistake twice.

And perhaps Guerrero will have a chance to make his presence felt with a big at-bat off the bench.

Red Sox owner: “spending money helps”

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The other day Rob Manfred said, as he and other owners have said often in the past, that there is no correlation between payroll and winning. He said that defensively, in response to criticism of the slow free agent market of the past two offseasons.

As we have noted in the past, Manfred is not being honest about that. While, yes, in any given year there can be wild variation between payroll and win total — the Giants stunk last year, the A’s won 97 games — common sense dictates otherwise. What’s more, a recent study has shown that there is a pretty strong correlation between winning and payroll over time. Yes, you can fluke into a big season with a low payroll — Deadspin compared it to a cold snap occurring during a time of climate change — but if you want that “sustained success” teams claim they want, the best way to ensure it is to spend more money over time.

If you know anything about baseball labor history, though, you know well that the Commissioner and the owners will continue to mischaracterize the dynamics of the business as it suits them. Mostly because — present lefty sportswriters notwithstanding — very few people push back on their narratives. Fans tend to parrot ownership’s line on this stuff and, more often than not, baseball media acts as stenographer for ownership as opposed to critic. That gives owners a far greater ability to shape the narrative about all of this than most institutions.

Which makes this all the more awkward. From David Schoenfield of ESPN:

In apparent contradiction to his own commissioner, Boston Red Sox owner John Henry said Monday that, while there is not a perfect correlation between a bigger payroll and winning, “spending more money helps.”

Which is right. The correlation is not perfect — teams can spend a lot of money on a bad team if given the chance and a low payroll team like the Rays can bullpen their way to 90 wins — but you’re way more likely to win year-in, year-out if you’re spending than if you go cheap all the time and hope for a miracle season.

Which is not to say that Henry is some labor activist owner. He and his fellow front office officials have a long history of backing the league office on just about everything that matters and will no doubt do so with labor matters in the runup to the next CBA negotiation. The owners tend not to have a solidarity problem.

But Henry does seem to draw the line at peddling baloney, which is a shockingly necessary thing when the league and the union’s relationship turns acrimonious.