Please, can we put an end to the “nobody believes in us!” nonsense?

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A comment in the Cliff Lee thread from a reader named “feartherallythong”:

 

“All the Giants-haters are cracking me up (I’m looking at you, Mr. Calcaterra). Of all the posts post-Game 1, I see a bunch of “How could the Rangers lose?”, and “What happened to Cliff Lee?” posts and stories. Even the MSM is referring almost exclusively to the game as a Rangers loss, not a Giants win. It’s funny. Lee had a sub-superhuman game, the Giants are hot and at home, their offense doesn’t suck as much as everyone says, and the only person to give props to the Giants for getting good wood on the ball was Cliff Lee himself. He gave up one walk, he wasn’t wild – the Giants are just hot, and seeing the ball well.

“This may be a 6 or 7-game series in the end, but when every pundit had the Rangers winning in 6, I was reminded of the underrated Graham Chapman in “Yellowbeard”, when he says, “We Yellowbeards are NEVER more dangerous then when we’re dead!”

First: this guy wins the internets for a “Yellowbeard” quote. That is FAN-tastic.  I saw that flick at the theater when it came out. I think that makes me one of six people in the country who can say that. And I loved it too. Of course, I was like nine at the time. Not sure it holds up. Not sure I want to watch it again to find out.

Second: Can we please dispense with the “nobody believes in us!” rebop?  I know that has become the custom every postseason, but it’s beyond tired. Even Yankees fans were doing it last season.

The fact of the matter is that, while more pundits picked the Rangers to win this thing than the Giants, no one I recall said it would be a walk. Almost every prediction I read was that this thing would go six or seven games, that it was very evenly matched, and that if x, y, or z didn’t happen, the Giants would be more than able to take control of the series.  Mad props were given all around to the Giants’ staff, which most people agree is stronger than the Rangers’ after you get past Lee, and almost everyone noted that despite the Giants’ poor offense, they’ve found a way to get past some excellent pitching in the postseason, so you can’t count them out.

But hey, if you need to think that everyone is hating on your team to get excited for the series, don’t let me get in your way.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.