Leo Mazzone wants to be Yankees’ or Mets’ pitching coach

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During a radio interview this morning longtime Braves pitching coach Leo Mazzone said that he’d be interested in taking the same position with the Yankees or Mets, calling both openings “a great job.”

Mazzone had an incredible amount of success in Atlanta and much of that was obviously due to the three Hall of Famers on the staff, but he also seemed to have a knack for plucking guys off the scrap heap and turning them into valuable pieces to go alongside Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and John Smoltz.

J.C. Bradbury studied Mazzone’s track record back in 2004 and found that, on average, he shaved about a half-run off a pitcher’s ERA when they joined the Braves, which is obviously amazing. ESPN.com named him the best “assistant coach” in sports history and there was even some Hall of Fame buzz.

However, after leaving Atlanta following the 2005 season Mazzone found little success as the Orioles’ pitching coach. He lasted just two seasons in Baltimore and was fired after the Orioles’ staff ranked second-worst in ERA and led baseball in walks in 2007. Mazzone has been working as a television analyst since being let go by the Orioles in October of 2007 and his lack of another opportunity during that time is certainly surprising.

At age 62 he’s unlikely to be a long-term solution anywhere and my guess is that the Yankees and Mets aren’t the type of teams Mazzone should be targeting for a comeback opportunity. Either the baseball world is convinced that he wasn’t as big a factor in the Braves’ amazing pitching as Bradbury’s study suggests or Mazzone really rubbed a lot of people the wrong way over the years, because the way pitching coaches are recycled it’s hard to imagine him not getting a third chance somewhere along the line.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.