Elias’ free agent compensation rankings revealed early

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After reverse engineering the system to determine unofficial free agent rankings throughout the season MLB Trade Rumors has gotten its hands on the official list from the Elias Sports Bureau.

There are no big surprises based on the unofficial, in-season protections done by MLBTR, as the reverse-engineered projections were “off” on only two players: Derrek Lee and Mark Ellis.

Several non-star players qualify as Type A free agents, which means teams that sign them must forfeit their first-round pick as long as the selection isn’t in the top 15. If it is a top-15 pick, then the team would lose their second rounder instead.

Cliff Lee, Carl Crawford, Victor Martinez, and Adam Dunn are some of the obvious Type A free agents. Among the lesser Type A qualifiers: Matt Guerrier, Jason Frasor, Grant Balfour, Ramon Hernandez, Jason Kubel, Dan Wheeler, Arthur Rhodes, Bengie Molina, A.J. Pierzynski.

Similarly there are some relatively big names who qualify as merely Type B free agents, which means teams are free to sign them without losing their first-round pick. Among the bigger name Type B qualifiers: Hiroki Kuroda, Aubrey Huff, Brian Fuentes, Johnny Damon, Orlando Hudson, Javier Vazquez, Carlos Pena, Lance Berkman, Hideki Matsui.

Also worth noting is that in order to receive compensation of any kind, regardless of the player’s classification, a team must offer their departing free agent salary arbitration. Depending on the circumstances some teams decline to do so, forfeiting compensation because they don’t want to risk the player accepting arbitration and forcing them into a one-year commitment.

MLB Trade Rumors has done a great job tracking the free agent rankings all season, so check out their full list of Type A and Type B qualifiers.

Rays moving spring camp due to damage caused by hurricane

Nathan Ray Seebeck-USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – The Tampa Bay Rays are relocating their spring base for 2023 due to extensive damage to team training facilities caused by Hurricane Ian.

The Rays have trained since 2009 in Port Charlotte, Florida, about 90 minutes south of St. Petersburg, and intend to explore several options before making a decision on where to hold spring training and play Grapefruit League games when camp opens.

The team and Charlotte County released a joint statement Thursday, saying damage to Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte can’t be repaired in time to host games this winter.

“Charlotte County supports the Rays efforts to secure alternative accommodations for 2023 spring training,” the statement said.

“We are all disappointed for the residents of Charlotte County and the fans there. The community is in the thoughts and hearts of the Rays, and the team will continue to support recovery efforts,” the statement added. “The Rays and Charlotte County intend to develop a restoration plan for Charlotte Sports Park in the coming weeks.”