Rangers missed out on drafting Tim Lincecum by two spots

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Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News has an interesting story about how the Rangers nearly ended up with Tim Lincecum.

Texas had the 12th overall pick in Jon Daniels’ first draft as general manager back in 2006 and “had identified the diminutive, hard-throwing right-hander from Washington as the club’s No. 1 target.”

According to Daniels the Rangers felt pretty confident that Lincecum would go undrafted through at least the first nine picks, but worried that the Giants would select him at No. 10 overall. San Francisco did end up selecting Lincecum, but in announcing the pick left out one of the zeroes on his official “draft number.”

“When the Giants started to call the number and there was no zero and I thought we got him,” Daniels told Grant. “Then they called the name. I remember asking our guys if we could have the pick nullified for not calling the zero. Apparently, you didn’t need to call the zero in the draft number.”

And so the Giants picked Lincecum at No. 10, the Diamondbacks selected Max Scherzer at No. 11, and the Rangers ended up with Kasey Kiker at No. 12. Lincecum has won back-to-back Cy Young awards and will start Game 1 tonight opposite Rangers ace Cliff Lee, while Kiker spent this season posting a 7.40 ERA at Double-A.

Report: Steve Cohen makes $2 billion offer to purchase Mets

Steve Cohen Mets offer
REUTERS/Steve Marcus
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Charles Gasparino reports that billionaire hedge fund manager Steve Cohen has submitted an offer to buy the Mets for $2 billion as well as an additional $2 billion for SportsNet New York (SNY). The Mets own a 65% controlling interest in SNY. (Full disclosure: Comcast, through NBC Sports Group, owns an 8% share of SNY.)

As Jon Heyman reported yesterday, the Mets were expected to accept the first round of bids by Thursday. Cohen was one of a handful of bidders that also included Josh Harris and David Blitzer, Álex Rodríguez and Jennifer Lopez, and the Reuben brothers.

Cohen and the Wilpons were believed to be in agreement on a deal back in December that would have increased Cohen’s ownership share from 8% to 80% in exchange for $2.6 billion. However, the deal fell through as Cohen grew upset the Wilpons attempted to change the terms of the agreement at the last minute. The two sides have, obviously, patched up their differences.

As Sportico’s Scott Soshnick notes, the offers in the first round of bidding are non-binding. At any rate, given Cohen’s preliminary offer, the Wilpons are likely to collect quite the windfall. Fred Wilpon bought a 50% stake in the Mets for $81 million in 1980 and bought the other half in 2002 for $391 million.

Perhaps with different owners, the Mets could get back to being consistently competitive. Since 2012, the club has sat in the middle-third of the league (rank 11-20) or lower in terms of total payroll.