Rangers and Giants: Teams of Destiny

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In the past 72 hours I have been on a handful of radio shows, and each time the host has asked me if I agreed that the Rangers looked like a “team of destiny.”  Well, not all of them. Some of them have asked me if I agreed that the Giants looked like  a “team of destiny.” Some quick Googling reveals multiple articles and forums in which the media covering and the fans rooting for both teams are considering whether their guys truly are fated to win this thing. The only person I’ve seen dismiss the concept out of hand is Jeff Francoeur, and since he’s wrong about just about everything maybe there’s something to this.

As a guy who doesn’t believe in fate or destiny or any related form of magical thinking, these questions have flummoxed me. I mean, man, even if the invisible hand of fate was making all of this happen, you’d think it would find a more efficacious avatar than Juan Uribe through which to work. But like I said, I’m out of my depth here.

But a lot of people do believe in this kind of thing, bless their little hearts. They truly believe that their team is destined to win. Which is fairly nuts. I mean, even if you find a Yankees fan with the most stereotypical sense of entitlement imaginable, they never say that theirs is a team of destiny. They think the Yankees win because of fairly simply yet immutable laws of nature, perfectly observable by scientists. And they’re probably closer to being right than the team of destiny crowd. There’s probably a lesson in here too: it’s only fans of flawed underdogs who believe that their team is a Team of Destiny. I mean, something had to help them get past the Phillies and the Yankees of the world, right?

The saddest thing about this is that one of the teams is going to have to win, thus making half of the Destiny Crowd believe they were right.  Who knows what other silly beliefs such a turn of events will bolster? If the fates deigned that their baseball team worthy of a championship, maybe they will make Junior’s strep throat go away without antibiotics. Maybe they’ll make that work-from-home business pan out.  One of these teams winning is going to screw up the social order, dammit, I just know it.

And for the losers? For the people who believed in fate, yet had their hopes and dreams crushed by a World Series loss? A descent into nihilism. Which is way worse than even believing that your team is fated to win.  I mean, say what you like about the tenets of Divine Predestination,  Dude, but at least it’s an ethos.

Aaron Boone receives one-game suspension for explosive tirade

Aaron Boone
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Yankees manager Aaron Boone has been suspended and fined for his actions during Thursday’s doubleheader against the Rays. Boone was ejected from Game 1 after making contact with home plate umpire Brennan Miller and will not be available to manage the Yankees during their series opener against the Rockies on Friday.

The ejection was triggered by a missed strikeout call in the second inning of Game 1, prompting Boone to run out to home plate and deliver one of his lengthier and more bizarre rants of the season. Incensed by Miller’s shaky grasp of the strike zone, Boone repeatedly referred to his players as “f***ing savages” and told the umpire to “tighten this s**t up.”

Exactly when the illicit contact came into play remains unclear, but crew chief Gerry Davis later commented on the situation and said Boone had crossed some boundaries during his tirade. Per MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch: “You’re not allowed to argue balls and strikes, so yeah. Yes he did [go too far]. That will all be in the report.”

In his own statements to the press, Boone defended his use of the word “savages,” claiming, “I always just want our guys all the time controlling the strike zone and making it hard on the pitchers. That’s something those guys take a lot of pride in as a lineup.” Several Yankees players, including Luke Voit and Aaron Judge, backed up the skipper’s decision to confront Miller as well, though Voit was the only player to explicitly support Boone’s use of the term.