Phillies have no plans for Jimmy Rollins contract extension

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Philadelphia has already exercised next season’s $8.5 million option on Jimmy Rollins, but general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday that the Phillies have no plans to negotiate a long-term extension right now:

I think we’ll probably let things, at this time, play out. There’s some concern about his production the last couple of years. He’s a much better player than he’s played. We just have to make sure he’s healthy.

Rollins turns 32 years old next month, missed half of this season with injuries, and has hit just .248 with a .304 on-base percentage and .406 slugging percentage during the past two years. His situation is somewhat similar to Derek Jeter’s in New York, albeit on a much lesser scale. Rollins has played his entire 11-year career in Philadelphia, winning the MVP in 2007 and ranking as one of the best players in team history, but he’s also getting old for a shortstop and hasn’t been productive offensively since 2008.

I’m sure Amaro and the Phillies would love to keep him in Philadelphia beyond 2011, but committing to Rollins into his mid-30s just doesn’t make much sense at this point unless he’s willing to take a significant pay cut to make it happen. It could mean losing him next offseason, but the Phillies are right to make Rollins play for his next contract.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.