Why Kirk Gibson is selling his stuff

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Remember how Kirk Gibson is selling a bunch of memorabilia, including the bat from the home run in the 1988 World Series? Today he tells the Detroit News why he’s doing it.  Part of it is charitable. Some of it seems like he would just like the money. But one part of it all resonates with me, and that’s his comment about how he has the memories locked in his head, so why keep the memorabilia?

I’ve always been that way. I’m not someone who casts aside everything, but I’m not a big totem keeper. Trophies or awards or keepsakes or what have you just don’t play a big role in my life. I have some things in boxes, but if you came into Chez Calcaterra you’d see an acceptable number of family pictures a couple of sentimental knicknacks and that’s really about it.  The baseball cards and sports memorabilia I keep around is more a matter of being too lazy to do anything with it than actually desiring to keep most of it.  It was all in my parents’ house until they dumped it at my house when they moved.  If it wouldn’t cost me an arm and a leg I’d ship it all to my brother tomorrow.

I understand I’m in the minority here. I wrote about autographs a couple of years ago and just about everyone disagreed with me then.  I just think that you remember the truly memorable things anyway. And while it’s nice to have your memory jogged a bit by a souvenir or memento of the occasion, keeping around too much of the past can prevent a person from keeping their eyes on the future.

 

Video: J.D. Martinez hits league-tying 23rd home run

Seattle Mariners v Boston Red Sox
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The Red Sox and Mariners left nothing on the table Friday night, going head-to-head in a series opener that eventually ended 14-10 in the Sox’ favor. Led by Steven Wright and Wade LeBlanc — neither of whom made it past the fifth inning — the teams combined for 34 hits and four home runs, including two moonshots from Seattle’s Nelson Cruz and a five-run rally that gave Boston the edge in the seventh.

In the sixth inning, however, the Red Sox were still scrambling to make up a four-run deficit. Left fielder J.D. Martinez cut it in half with one swing, pouncing on an 89.5-mph fastball from Seattle right-hander Nick Vincent and posting it to dead center field for a two-run shot.

The 427-foot blast was Martinez’s 23rd of the season, tying Mike Trout for the most home runs in the league this year. While he still has a ways to go before eclipsing the career-best 45-HR mark he set in 2017, he’s off to a strong start this season: Entering Friday’s game, the 30-year-old slugger was batting .315/.386/.623 with a 1.009 OPS and AL-leading 55 RBI in 308 PA. He finished Friday’s game 4-for-5 with five RBI, just one triple shy of hitting for the cycle.

Heading into the All-Star Break, both Martinez and Trout still have some competition for the home run title. Jose Ramirez is sitting at 22 homers, while Nelson Cruz and Khris Davis are tied at 20 apiece.