Baseball considering a concussions disabled list

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UPDATERob Neyer responds and distills the responses I’ve heard from others on this. The upshot: there may be a lot of low-level concussions that occur that are sort of flying under the radar, and that by having a short DL option, teams may be more willing to call a concussion a concussion and put the player on the shelf for a few days.

I guess I get this. My sense, though, is to still think that if concussions — even minor ones — are as dangerous as we’re starting to believe, that we should be erring on the side of more time off for players who suffer them, not less.

2:35 P.M. The Associated Press has learned that Major League Baseball is considering a 7-day disabled list for players with concussions, and that it could go into effect as early as next year.

There are really no details provided, but I’m not sure I get this.  Are there any players who have been diagnosed with concussions who have not missed at least 15 days on the regular disabled list? Jason Bay and Justin Morneau each missed the remainder of the season after suffering concussions of their own.

What purpose does this serve?  Wouldn’t a 15-day DL better protect players by making them, you know, sit out at least 15 days? At the end of the day, isn’t it the case that someone has to be healthy and cleared by medical staff in order to resume playing? How would a separate disabled list change this approach in any way?

This smells like PR to me. At a time when the NFL is getting killed — perhaps righteously — over concussions, this feels to me like baseball trying to get ahead of media scrutiny as opposed to addressing an actual need.

Video: Edwin Encarnación grounds into 5-4-3 triple play

Mike Stobe/Getty Images
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The Yankees threatened early against the Twins in the top of the first inning of Monday night’s game in Minnesota. DJ LeMahieu and Aaron Judge drew leadoff walks Martín Pérez, bringing up slugger Edwin Encarnación. Encarnación battled Pérez, ultimately rolling over on the ninth pitch, a change-up. Third baseman Luis Arraez gobbled it up and stepped on the third base bag, then fired to Jonathan Schoop at second base for the second out. Schoop got the ball over to Miguel Sanó at first base just in time to complete the 5-4-3 triple play.

It’s the second triple play turned this year, as the White Sox also accomplished a 5-4-3 double play on May 22 against the Astros. The Twins’ last triple play occurred on June 1, 2017 against the Angels, also a 5-4-3 triple-killing.

The Yankees were eventually able to generate some offense in the third inning on a Gio Urshela solo homer and an RBI single from Encarnación. It’s a 2-2 game as this gets published.