Quote of the Day: Reggie Jackson on Andy Pettitte’s Hall of Fame chances

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Here’s Reggie Jackson taking about tonight’s matchup:

“I think if Andy beats Lee, it would make any [Hall of Fame] voter that’s on the borderline put him in. I think Andy has a strong resume now for the Hall of Fame, and I think he’ll already get strong consideration. But something like this would give him additional consideration.”

People are pretty simple creatures. We approve when people do like we do. We disapprove when people do differently. If something we did made us great, of course we’re going to think that someone else behaving similarly is great too. In light of that, perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised that a guy who is best known for what he did in one postseason game puts undue emphasis on what another player may or may not do in one postseason game.

That said, Reggie Jackson had more than one great game on his Hall of Fame resume. It took an entire career’s worth of work to get him to Cooperstown.  My gut feeling: Andy Pettitte, for all of his accomplishments, doesn’t have the same quality of a career, and I don’t think he’s ultimately a Hall of Fame pitcher, whether he beats Cliff Lee or not.

I don’t think he’s a Jack Morris case (i.e. a guy no one with sense should consider for the Hall). I will understand one day when people push hard for him. But in my mind, he’s Hall of Very Good. He’s Hall of Excellent Postseason. But he’s not, in my mind, a Hall of Famer.

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that some of you disagree.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.