What if Roberto Alomar does have HIV?

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Paul Sax is a big baseball fan and a longtime reader of mine. He’s also a doctor who writes a blog about HIV, infectious diseases and the medical and ethical issues that surround them.  He has several sharp observations today in light of the Roberto Almoar HIV allegations. Among them:

For another stark example of how HIV differs from other serious
diseases (even those related to unhealthy choices), Hall of Famer Tony
Gwynn has just been diagnosed with salivary gland cancer, likely due to chewing tobacco.  The response?  Mostly sympathy, very little blame or snark.

If the allegations of his wife are true and Alomar lied about or withheld information about his HIV status, he has certainly done something terribly wrong. But what if they’re not true? What if he does have HIV but he did not lie or mislead anyone about his status?  What if, as seemed to be the case with last year’s lawsuit, someone is merely gunning for the guy?

If that’s the case, I’ll be curious to see how he is treated by the general public. Will he get the Gwynn treatment and be supported despite contracting what is typically an avoidable disease through — at worst — irresponsible behavior? Or will he be stigmatized?

I’d like to think we’ve come a long way regarding HIV and AIDS in the past 25 years.  I fear we have not, however, and that if Alomar does have HIV, he’ll be treated like an outcast.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.