Great Moments in fact checking: The New Yorker

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The New Yorker — a fine damn magazine even if I ended up reading more cartoons (“it’s a Ziggy!”) than articles when I had a subscription a few years back — makes a minor error in a story about the Red Sox buying Liverpool FC:

Major
League Baseball is a collusive oligopoly in which the team’s owners,
with the help of a salary cap, restricted entry, and an exemption from
the anti-trust laws, conspire against the players and the fans to enrich
themselves.

They had me until “salary cap.” Maybe they had best stick to, I dunno, opera reviews or whatever it is that they do best.

Oh, and a big thumbs up to SportsBusiness Journal’s Daniel Kaplan for being the one to catch this. I didn’t realize it, but apparently SBJ and the New Yorker are sister publications. Takes some big cojones to point out when someone in the company makes a mistake like that.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to write some hyper-critical posts in my personal blog dedicated to the destruction of Jay Leno, Brian Williams, Matt Lauer and Tina Fey.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.