The Brewers decline to pick up Ken Macha's 2011 option

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This is neither (a) technically a firing; or (b) a surprise, but it’s now official — via team press release — that the Brewers and Ken Macha are parting ways.

It’s not a firing because Macha’s contract was only a two-year thing and it’s now up. The mechanism of his departure is the team declining to pick up his option for 2011.  It’s not a surprise because people have been reporting that this was going down since last night, and have been reasonably assuming this was going down for a solid couple of months.

What ultimately did him in was the pitching, obviously. No, Macha was not blessed with a deep and talented staff. At the same time, he didn’t do a great job in trying to get the best out of what he had either.  Oh, and the fact that, as he walked out the door on the 2010 season he bashed the two best players on his team didn’t help matters. Sure, maybe Braun and Fielder didn’t respond to Macha and maybe it wasn’t his fault. But I don’t get why you basically throw it on them as you’re leaving. It all suggests some bad blood that has gone largely unreported.

There has been very little buzz about possible replacements for Macha in recent weeks. I would expect the usual suspects — Bob Melvin, Ted Simmons, maybe even Willie Randolph, despite his denials of interest in the job — to be mentioned. I still kind of like my Ryne Sandberg idea, but I suppose Cubs-spite is not the strongest basis on which to make such decisions.

Here’s one: Jose Oquendo. He’s gotta be tired of waiting for Tony La Russa to retire, he knows the NL Central and the dude played every damn position on the diamond back in the day.  Make it happen Doug Melvin.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.