There goes the neighborhood: Twins and Timberwolves fight over 2,800-square foot billboard

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Despite being next-door neighbors in downtown Minneapolis and having the same corporate sponsorship for their venues the Twins and Timberwolves are having a squabble over the size and placement of a new advertisement.
Target Center, which is home to the Timberwolves, is currently installing a 2,800-square foot billboard advertising local health care provider Sanford Health that is prominent in the Target Field skyline and visible from many of the seats in the Twins’ home.
With the billboard conveniently set to be fully installed in time for the Twins’ playoff opener Wednesday, team president Dave St. Peter called it “an ambush on the ballpark.” Here’s more from St. Peter:

While the Twins always understood an ambush on the ballpark was possible, the sheer size of the proposed signage is shocking. We feel particularly bad about how this signage dominates the new civic gathering place known as Target Plaza. Needless to say it’s disappointing considering the large private investment to create this dynamic celebration of public art, which was in essence a gift to the city of Minneapolis.

There’s some irony is getting upset about an advertisement ruining “the new civic gathering place known as Target Plaza” that is, in fact, a form of advertising (or at least corporate sponsorship) itself. It would be kind of like complaining about there being too many commercials during an infomercial. And make no mistake, there are plenty of prominent ads visible throughout the Twins’ still-beautiful ballpark.
Timberwolves president Chris Wright told David Brauer of MinnPost that he “would disagree with those characterizations” and has “the authority and the right to take advantage of a terrific development that occurred behind our building.”

Rays’ Díaz gets $24 million, three-year deal, avoids arbitration

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Tampa Bay Rays infielder Yandy Díaz agreed to a $24 million, three-year contract on Tuesday that avoided a salary arbitration hearing.

Díaz’s agreement could be worth $36 million over four seasons.

The 31-year old will receive $6 million this season, $8 million in 2024 and $10 million for 2025. The 2026 club is $12 million with no buyout. There is a $1 million assignment bonus that would be payable by receiving team.

Díaz has spent parts of six seasons in the majors with Cleveland (2017-18) and Tampa Bay (2019-22). He has a career average of .278 with 39 home runs and 198 RBIs.

Acquired by the Rays in a three-team trade on Dec. 13, 2018, Díaz hit .296 with nine homers and 57 RBIs in 137 games last season, He career highs with 71 runs, 140 hits, 33 doubles, and 78 walks.

Díaz was the third Rays’ arbitration-eligible player to reach a deal.

Reliever Pete Fairbanks agreed Friday to a $12 million, three-year contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons. The 29-year-old right-hander was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Left-hander Jeffrey Springs also agreed last week to a $31 million, four-year contract that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

The 30-year-old began last season in the bullpen and transitioned to the starting rotation in May and finished 9-5 with a 2.46 ERA in 33 appearances, including 25 starts.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, and outfielder Harold Ramírez.