Francisco Liriano leaves Friday's start due to illness

Leave a comment

Francisco Liriano just gave Twins fans quite the temporary scare. The left-hander was pulled from tonight’s start against the Tigers in the fourth inning. Before we even had a moment to speculate about what may have happened to him, the team announced that Liriano left the game due to illness, reports Kelly Thesier of MLB.com. Phew.

The funny part is that Alexi Casilla left the game for the very same reason at the very same time, as he was replaced at shortstop by Trevor Plouffe.

Methinks either Liriano and Casilla are suffering from a multiple-day hangover
after the Twins clinched the AL Central or there is a pretty nasty bug going around
the locker room. Hey, at least Twins fans have permission to laugh about this whole thing now.

More position players have pitched this year than ever

Getty Images
7 Comments

Yesterday, in Milwaukee, utilityman Hernan Perez pitched two scoreless innings, and backup catcher Erik Kratz pitched one himself, mopping up in a blowout loss to the Dodgers. In doing so they became the 31st and 32nd position players to pitch this season. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, that is the most position players who have taken the mound in a season in the Expansion Era, which began in 1961. Presumably far fewer ever did so when the league had only 16 teams.

It’s pretty remarkable to set that record now, in this age of 13 and sometimes 14-man pitching staffs. That’s especially true when teams shuttle guys back and forth from the minors more often than they ever have before and when, due to the shortened, 10-day disabled list, it’s easier to give guys breaks because of “injuries” than it ever has been.

Pitcher usage is driving this, however. While teams carry far more relievers than they ever have before, they actually carry far fewer swingmen or mopup men who are capable of throwing multiple innings in a blowout to save other pitchers’ arms. Rather, teams focus on max-effort, high-velocity relievers who go one or two innings tops, thus requiring catchers and utility guys to help do the mopping that actual pitchers used to do.

I don’t know if that’s a bad thing necessarily — some of these backup catchers throw harder than a lot of pitchers did 30 years ago and it’s always kind of fun to see a position player pitch — but it is yet another way the game has changed due to a focus on specialization and velocity when it comes to pitchers.