Jim Edmonds injures himself on home run trot

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If ever there was a sign a ballplayer should retire, this would be it:

Cincinnati’s Jim Edmonds injured his right leg running the bases after a solo home run in the second and did not return to the field in the bottom of the inning.

The Reds say that Edmonds, 40, has a strained right lower leg. According to the Associated Press, he hurt himself while “taking awkward steps just before he reached third base.”

Edmonds sat out all of 2009 before launching a comeback with the Milwaukee Brewers this season. He was traded to the Reds on Aug. 9.

Edmonds has already said he would likely retire at the end of this season, and Brewers manager Ken Kacha actually talked him out of quitting in early August. Seeing as how he has already been on the disabled list this season and is now getting hurt on home run trots, retirement seems just about guaranteed.

Now let the Hall of Fame debate rage. What do you think?

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Tom Ricketts says the Cubs don’t have any more money

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Cubs owner Tom Ricketts met the media in Mesa, Arizona today and said a couple of things that were fun.

First, he addressed the controversy that arose earlier this month when emails of his father’s — family patriarch Joe Ricketts — were leaked, showing him forwarding and approvingly commenting on racist jokes. Ricketts apologized for those serving as a “distraction” for the Cubs which, OK. He also said “Those aren’t the values our family was raised with… I never heard my father say anything remotely racist.” If you choose to believe that a 77-year-old conservative guy who loves racist emails — who once spearheaded an anti-Obama ad campaign that required a “literate African-American” as its spokesman — hasn’t said racist stuff a-plenty, that’s between you and your credulity.

More relevant to the 2019 Cubs is this:

The Cubs aren’t in the same position as some other contenders in that (a) they don’t have a cheap payroll; and (b) are not obvious candidates for the big free agents like Harper or Machado, but I still find that comment pretty rich for an owner of one of baseball’s marquee franchises in a non-salary cap league. If nothing else, it’s an admission by Ricketts that he, like the other owners, consider the Luxury Tax to be a defacto salary cap.