FanHouse's David Whitley cannot explain the concept of love to his children

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Last week I wrote of my distaste of the casual homophobia fostered by the Kiss Cam and some St. Louis fans’ desire to use it as a means of protest.  I missed this at the time, but David Whitley of FanHouse wrote about it on the same day. He took a bit of a different tack than I did:

I’d like to take the socially enlightened high road on this one, but I can’t help sympathizing with that father who’ll be sitting next to his son or daughter at Busch Stadium.

“Daddy, why are those two men kissing?”

“Umm, err, hey isn’t that Albert Pujols coming to bat?”

I just so happen to have a son and a daughter. If either of them asked me that question, the answer would be “because they love each other.”  Then again, maybe I just don’t appreciate all of the nuance of the allegedly complicated scenario Whitley has set up for us.

Kids understand love. It’s a pretty easy concept. What they may have a hard time understanding is being used as a rhetorical “think of the children” prop designed to hide the author’s deep, deep discomfort with homosexuality in an online column. Whitley:

Call me homophobic, but I just don’t think a 5- or 10-year-old brain is ready to tackle those complexities.

Fine. You’re homophobic.

And you know what kinds of complexities my five year-old has a hard time understanding? Unfairness. Like when his sister gets a toy and he doesn’t. Or when his friend gets a cookie but he doesn’t. And while it hasn’t come up yet, I can guarantee you that he’d have an equally hard time understanding why some folks get to marry the people they love and some people don’t. Indeed, the unfairness of that would be as plain as could be.

Wanna know hard? Try explaining to your kid the rationale behind such disparate treatment. I bet you can’t.  Not even to a five year-old.

Nick Markakis leads all NL outfielders in All-Star voting

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I would hope by now that I no longer have to preface All-Star talk with my usual “none of this matters” disclaimers, but please keep all of that in mind when I mention that Nick Markakis is leading all National League outfielders in All-Star voting.

Markakis, with 1,173,653 votes, has surpassed the slumping Bryce Harper in that category. Harper has 1,002,696 votes. The third place outfielder is Matt Kemp of the Dodgers with 925,697. Fourth place — Charlie Blackmon of the Dodgers — is like 300,000 votes back of Kemp.Yes, Markakis, Harper and Kemp may be the starting NL outfield. Brandon Nimmo — not on the ballot — should be grumpy, but he’ll get his chance I’m sure.

The thing about it: Markakis, for as unexpected as his appearance may be on this list, deserves to at least be in the top three. He’s second in WAR among National League outfielders behind Lorenzo Cain. He’s slowed down a good bit in June and he’s coming off of a 2017 season in which he had a 96 OPS+ and 0.7 WAR, but he’s having quite an outstanding season. I write that mostly so that there is a record of it come October and we’ve all forgotten it.

Seriously, though, good for Markakis, who has never made an All-Star Game. Good for Kemp too for that matter, who most people assumed was a walking — well, limping — corpse heading into this season. Good for Harper because anything that can keep up the guise of him having a good year when, in reality, he’s really not, will help his confidence as he heads into free agency.

Finally, good for the American League, who will likely get to face a far, far inferior National League team next month in Washington.

The rest of the voting: