Homer Bailey left last night's start with "dizziness" and "a big headache"

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Homer Bailey showed significantly decreased velocity and struggled through three terrible innings last night before leaving his start against Arizona with dizziness.
It wasn’t even mentioned until the seventh paragraph of John Fay’s game story in the Cincinnati Enquirer, but Bailey’s comments afterward sure make it seem like it’s a bigger deal:

I felt a little bit of light-headedness. I had a big headache. I thought my hat might be too tight. How many did I walk? Twenty? I had trouble keeping balance.

According to Fay he was “checked out by the Reds’ medical staff” and told to simply rest, but Bailey tossed eight innings of dominant, shutout ball in his previous start five days earlier and there’s no indication why he experienced “light-headedness” and “a big headache” while having “trouble keeping balance.”
Mark Sheldon of MLB.com reports (this time in the 10th paragraph of his game story) that Bailey was given Dramamine “to settle his symptoms” after coming out of the game. Hopefully it’s indeed just a one-time thing, because Bailey has pitched well since rejoining the Reds’ rotation a month ago, posting a 3.62 ERA and 31/7 K/BB ratio in 37 innings prior to last night.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.