The Coors Field visitor bullpens are awesome

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There’s a story in the San Diego Union Tribune today about how great the visitor’s bullpen is in Colorado. It’s set among all that landscaping you can see when you look out towards centerfield, and according to the Padres relievers, it’s simply lovely.

“They made it look like we’re in the Rockies with the trees. You can
follow a trail out of the visitors’ bullpen that goes behind the
waterfall and around the lake,” said Heath Bell. “It’s very peaceful, almost zen-like. Why is it so nice?” said Adam Russell. Luke Gregrson has a mixed take, but on the whole it sounds nice: “It’s like throwing in a wooded glen. I keep waiting for some animal to jump out of the trees and attack us.”

There’s mention in the piece of some of the worst visitors bullpens, many of which seem designed to make the visiting relievers uncomfortable. Good reading.

On that score, though, none can beat the pens in Tiger Stadium.  You used to warm up on the sidelines like you do in a lot of old parks. But the relievers “bench” resembled the tiger cage Chuck Norris was stuffed into in those “Missing in Action” movies. Here’s a pic.

When I was a kid going to that park I used to think they were cool. Like little forts.  Being shoved in there as a grownup with mild claustrophobia issues, however, seems like it would be torture, even if the whole point of it was player safety.

Mets GM Brodie Van Wagenen has kissed Rob Manfred’s ring

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Let’s take a trip back to early last February. The hot stove season was as cold as ice. Despite spring training being less than two weeks away, scores of players remained unsigned and rumblings emerged that, perhaps, collusion was to blame.

The players were frustrated and there were reports that they were approaching the union to ask what, if anything, they could do about it. Some suggested some sort of wildcat strike or work slowdown or whatever. None of that seemed feasible or legal, but guys were getting desperate. And not just players. One agent, Brodie Van Wagenen of CAA, took to Twitter to suggest something novel along these lines: a potential spring training boycott:

There is a rising tide among players for radical change. A fight is brewing. And it may begin with one, maybe two and, perhaps, 1,200 willing to follow. A boycott of Spring Training may be a starting point if behavior doesn’t change.

There was a lot more to that — Van Wagenen issued a whole statement attached to his tweet taking the owners to task and clearly implying that he believed the owners were acting less-than-scrupulously — but I can’t remember what it said and I can’t check because, at some point between then and now, Van Wagenen deleted it.

Probably because he is now the general manager of the New York Mets, putting him on the side of management, not players. Probably because he now, ultimately, answers to Rob Manfred. The same Rob Manfred, Ken Davidoff of the New York Post reports, met with Van Wagenen at the just-concluded owners meetings down in Atlanta.

Based on Davidoff’s report — which deals specifically with Van Wagenen’s February tweet — it sounds like they have come to an . . . understanding about it all. Manfred:

“Brodie called me right after he accepted the job,” Manfred said during a news conference. “We had a really good conversation. I think that he understands the concerns that a comment like that raises amongst our group. But I have every confidence that he’s going to conduct himself in a way that will make him a really productive member of the baseball family.”

“Don Corleone, I am honored and grateful that you have invited me to your daughter… ‘s wedding… on the day of your daughter’s wedding. And I hope their first child be a masculine child. I pledge my ever-ending loyalty,” Van Wagenen did not add but may as well have.