Wins matter for the Cy Young Award. Except when they don't.

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Excerpt from Jon Paul Morosi’s column about David Price and CC Sabathia’s battle last night:

And where was Cy Young candidate Felix Hernandez during all of this? In Seattle, with his last-place team, about as far away from meaningful baseball as a pitcher can get . . . There’s an award for a pitcher such as Hernandez. It’s called the ERA
title. Not the Cy Young Award, as voted on by the Baseball Writers’
Association of America.

To be the best, one must do what Sabathia and Price have all
season — compete against the best lineups, in postseason-type
atmospheres, before crazed crowds at hitter-friendly ballparks. And win.

Excerpt from Jon Paul Morosi’s column last year, calling Zack Greinke’s Cy Young Award “most deserving”:

“I do feel Greinke deserved the award,” Justin Verlander said in an e-mail on Tuesday. “He had an outstanding year.
“I know that his win (total) wasn’t as good as some would like to see
out of a Cy Young winner, but I believe that wins are not the most
telling stat of how a pitcher performed.”
How true . . . Verlander said Greinke’s 2.16 ERA “speaks for itself,” and he is absolutely right.

I guess win total matters more this year than it did last year. And apparently Hernandez’s ERA doesn’t speak as loudly as Greinke’s did.

Man, it must be hard to vote for the Cy Young Award, what with the criteria for winning it changing year-in-year out. Gotta stay on your toes!

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.