Mark Teixeira playing through broken toe

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Mark Teixeira revealed to the New York Post that he’s been playing with a broken pinkie toe on his right foot, the result of a HBP from Oakland’s Vin Mazzaro on Aug. 31.
“Every step I take it stings,” Teixeira told the paper. “It’s worse on defense because I have to move side to side and shuffle.”
Teixeira has slumped while playing with the injury. He hit .289/.355/.629 with nine homers in August, but through 12 games in September, he’s at .209/.370/.256. He has just two extra-base hits in 43 at-bats, both of them doubles.
“I can’t work out a lot, I am taking less ground balls and less swings in the cage,” he explained.
If Teixeira continues to struggle with the pain, he could start alternating off days with Alex Rodriguez down the stretch.

Mariano Rivera elected to Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously

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Former Yankees closer Mariano Rivera deservingly became the first player ever inducted into the Hall of Fame unanimously, receiving votes from all 425 writers who submitted ballots. Previously, the closest players to unanimous induction were Ken Griffey, Jr. (99.32% in 2016), Tom Seaver (98.84% in 1992), Nolan Ryan (98.79% in 1999), Cal Ripken, Jr. (98.53%), Ty Cobb (98.23% in 1936), and George Brett (98.19% in 1999).

Because so many greats were not enshrined in Cooperstown unanimously, many voters in the past argued against other players getting inducted unanimously, withholding their votes for otherwise deserving players. That Griffey — both one of the greatest outfielders of all time and one of the most popular players of all time — wasn’t voted in unanimously in 2016, for example, seemed to signal that no player ever would. Now that Rivera has been, this tired argument about voting unanimity can be laid to rest.

Derek Jeter will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time next year. He may become the second player ever to be elected unanimously. David Ortiz appears on the 2022 ballot and could be No. 3. Now that Rivera has broken through, these are possibilities whereas before they might not have been.

Another tired argument around Hall of Fame voting concerns whether or not a player is a “first ballot” Hall of Famer. Some voters think getting enshrined in a player’s first year of eligibility is a greater honor than getting in any subsequent year. I’m not sure what it will take to get rid of this argument — other than the electorate getting younger and more open-minded — but at least we have made progress on at least one bad Hall of Fame take.