FYI: The NCAA is still trying to screw amateur athletes

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Despite the fact that it had once been held to be illegal and will likely be held to be illegal again when someone else challenges it, the NCAA’s rule prohibiting amateur athletes from having an attorney make direct contact with a pro sports team is still on the books. This means that if you’re a 17 year-old draftee and you want to negotiate with the New York Yankees, you have to do it yourself rather than have a lawyer or agent do it unless you want to lose all college eligibility.

Because that’s really fair and everything.

I’ve been railing against this rule for years, but today Jordan Kobritz takes a nice vitriol-filled swipe at it over at the Biz of Baseball which is worth your time.  The occasion: apparently the Pirates, the Padres and other clubs have complained that they had to talk to skilled lawyers rather than 17 year old ballplayers while trying to negotiate contracts during the signing period that recently ended. If those complaints go anywhere, the students in question could be disqualified from playing college ball.

I’d quote Vonnegut and suggest that the NCAA can do something with respect to a rolling doughnut, but this is a family site and I’d prefer not to use that kind of language.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.