South Korea comes up with a novel (and bad) drug testing plan

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This is the logical conclusion of allowing statistics and records determine how outraged we should be about PEDs:

South Korean baseball officials could introduce drastic
anti-doping protocols next year with a plan to target specific players
for drug tests.

The Korean Baseball Organisation (KBO) said players who showed marked
statistical improvement would be targeted in a clampdown on drug
cheats, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported on Wednesday . . . League officials said they would begin examining the new testing
procedures at the end of the season with players exceeding their career
averages set to be selected for testing.

We could call it the Norm Cash or the Zolio Versalles Rule.

For what it’s worth, I’m struck by the notion that the vast majority of PED users mentioned in the Mitchell Report and those caught by subsequent testing protocols kind of, you know, sucked. So I can’t see that such a testing procedure ever would have worked all that well here.

(link via BTF)

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.